The Best Five Restaurants in West Hollywood – #1 & #2

THE BEST ISN’T ALWAYS THE HARDEST RESERVATION,
NOR IS IT ALWAYS THE MOST EXPENSIVE.
HOWEVER, THERE IS ONE CRITERIA THAT SEEMS TO UNITE
ALL GREAT RESTAURANTS: GRACIOUSNESS.

Renowned food geek Alton Brown once said: “Good service can save a bad meal, but there is no level of food that can save bad service.” Not to say that any of the food on this list is lacking in taste or refinement, but these five restaurants make sure that not only do you leave with a bit of an education for your palate, but you also leave with a smile for your face.

With just enough spice to beguile you into coming back. But when you do, that bird has flown the coop, gone in a flight of fancy only to be replaced with chicken and biscuits in a charred corn sauce. And though the menu whistles Dixie, it may also take a breezy tour of the Mediterranean as well.

Chef Williams knows that impermanence is a sound philosophy for approaching food. The market, along with his muse, always has the last word. Pair that kind of inspiration with a sleek and crisp dining room on Santa Monica Boulevard, a marble bar serving clever concoctions and a welcoming front of the house and you have everything a go-to restaurant should be.

THE BEST FIVE RESTAURANTS IN CRITICS REVIEW: JAMES TIPPER  – (Here are the first two)
“Good Service Can Save A Bad Meal, But There Is No Level Of Food That Can Save Bad Service.”

1. NORAH: 8279 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD, (323) 450-4211

There’s a lot of bad cornbread in the world. A lot. So for a restaurant to open its menu with the best version you’ll ever have, means you’re about to get schooled. In this case your professor is Chef Mike Williams, who hints at Southern decadence later in the menu in the form of his grits topped with fried quail that slaps you with just enough spice to beguile you into coming back. But when you do, that bird has flown the coop, gone in a flight of fancy only to be replaced with chicken and biscuits in a charred corn sauce. And though the menu whistles Dixie, it may also take a breezy tour of the Mediterranean as well.

Chef Williams knows that impermanence is a sound philosophy for approaching food. The market, along with his muse, always has the last word. Pair that kind of inspiration with a sleek and crisp dining room on Santa Monica Boulevard, a marble bar serving clever concoctions and a welcoming front of the house and you have everything a go-to restaurant should be.

2. PETROSSIAN: PARIS BOUTIQUE AND RESTAURANT 321 S. ROBERTSON BOULEVARD, (310) 271-6300

Petrossian caviar was born in Paris in 1920, and it wasn’t long before it cornered the market in the toniest parts of the City of Lights. It took Manhattan in the 80s, and in 2001 Petrossian consecrated WeHo’s swankiest boulevard with our own temple of the black pearls. But it’s not all just fish eggs here – though its Thursday night Caviar Class is a must – it also has quietly
remained a paean to well-crafted cuisine and charcuterie in a setting that manages to be both refined and relaxed.

Expense account lunchers may have a pat of torchon d’ foie gras melting on warm toast points beneath a kiss of quince jam. Dinners may start with one of 40 vodkas served in flutes or a surprisingly well curated list of single malt Scotches for such a Gallic enclave. Let a full bodied Macallan lead you into a starter of roasted bone marrow with onion marmalade, or go big with a bottle of Sancerre for your lobster pasta, velvety with uni butter and scented with tarragon. Sunday brunch on the patio beneath the warm autumn sun with a flute of champagne and their subtle, house-smoked salmon is a meditation on harmony.

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